On National Rescue Dog Day we can’t help expressing our appreciation to all the rescue parents out there. Not to mention, since we began quarantine, rescue dogs have begun to play an active role in many families. To honor those lives that have been saved we would like to offer some useful tips on making your precious rescue pup more comfortable at home. 

  1. It’s a brand new space: Dogs that have become familiar with a kennel environment might go through a bit of an adjustment period in the home. Be patient, getting used to a new routine can take at least a week or two. 
  2. Invest in Training: Even if your new best friend is fairly well behaved, a little training goes a long way. As mentioned above, most dogs take at least two weeks to get settled and then their temperaments start to become more apparent. If you’re offering them some guidance and structure from the beginning, you’re ahead of the curve. 
  3. Kennel Up: Even though you may feel that your rescue just finished spending most of his life in a “cage”, consider this before ditching the kennel training. Dogs are natural den animals, and your shelter dog is no different. Giving them a safe space to go to when things get overwhelming can oftentimes assist them in becoming acclimated to their new surroundings. 
  4. Toys, toys, toys: Mainly self-soothing, non-interactive toys. Before bringing your best friend home try investing in puzzle toys, such as the Kong wobbler or beehive toy. This will not only give your dog something to focus on when he’s simply “hanging around”, but it’s great reinforcement for being near the family and also mentally engaging. 

For all the rescuers out there, kudos to you! You make us proud and we are always here to help. To find out more about training programs or classes that can benefit you and your new found pup, reach out to our office. We hope these tips were helpful in making your awesome new family member feel at home. 

×
We're here to help! Enter your info to get a call back from one of our certified professional trainers.
Talk to a Trainer

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This